Point Nepean National Park: the Quarantine Station

The Quarantine Station at Point Nepean was first opened in 1852 and officially closed 1980. From 1951 until 1998 the station also housed the Australian Army Officer Cadet School and the School of Army Health.

One of the original Hospital buildings
One of five Hospital buildings

Today, many of the buildings are open to the public and offer an insight into life on a Quarantine Station and the history of immigration to Australia. One of the most well known ships to moor off Point Nepean and raise the yellow flag was the Ticonderoga in November 1852. In the terrible living conditions, 93 passengers died of Typhus on board the ship during the voyage from Liverpool to Melbourne with many bodies being thrown overboard and a further 70 would die at the basic quarantine station which was completely unprepared for the catastrophe unfolding. Tents were made using the ships rigging, two huts were bought from local lime burners to use as infirmaries and a ship, the Lysander, was anchored off the coast and used to house the most serious cases.

PNQ- monument

It didn’t take long after the Ticonderoga incident for the building of a proper Quarantine station. Five hospital buildings were built in 1858/59. One was used for the sick, the others to house those not showing symptoms but quarantined in case. Other buildings were built for fumigating passengers luggage with formaldehyde and bath houses where passengers had to take baths using antiseptic soap.

PNQ chimney
buildings containing baths and the fumigation chambers
PNQ- fumegation
fumigation chamber

The station protected the colony (and later state) of Victoria from many epidemics including the Spanish Influenza epidemic in 1918/19 and many bouts of infectious diseases like measles, typhus, cholera, smallpox and more.

PNQ- hospital building
main hospital building where the sickest passengers were taken.

As science advanced and the need for such stations decreased, the Army took over some of the buildings for use as a training facility for Army officer cadets and Army health. Most recently, the station was home to over 400 Kosovar refugees during the  1998/99 conflict.

Today, the Quarantine Station, along with the Army forts, is managed by Parks Victoria and is popular day out for visitors to the National Park.

beach in front of the Quarantine Station
beach in front of the Quarantine Station

xx Lauren- navy

Point Nepean National Park: The Forts

When I decided that I was going to do the 4 day hike to Machu Picchu, I knew that I would have to do some training. One of my favourite place to go hiking close to home is located at the very tip of the Mornington Peninsula- Point Nepean National Park.

Over the years, this park has been home to a Quarantine Station for newly arrived immigrants to the city of Melbourne, and also to the Royal Australian Army.

In this post I thought I’d cover the army forts at the very tip of the park.

PN- stairs

The forts were commissioned in the late 1800’s as the City of Melbourne was growing in importance and defences were needed. It’s location, along with the forts at Point Lonsdale on the Bellarine Peninsula, guard the entrance to Port Phillip bay in which lies the Port of Melbourne.

At the beginning of World War 1, the German Merchant ship departed the Port of Melbourne moments before War was declared and tried to flee the bay for the safety of open waters before they could be detained. Unfortunately for them, the word that England had declared War against Germany got the soldiers at the fort before they could make it out of the bay and a shot was fired across their bow from Gun Enplacement Six. This was the first shot to be fired in World War 1 and the German captain surrendered to the Australians. Interestingly, the first Australian shot of WW2 was also fired from Gun Enplacement Six!

Today there is still plenty to see with bunkers scattered all along the coastline and tunnels that once held ammunition stores open for exploration. Parks Victoria has also done an amazing job when it comes to signage explaining the history and importance of the sites.

PN- beach
Can you see the bunker?

PN army sign

PN sign

PN- sign 2
Signs that shouldn’t be ignored

 

The National Park is also home to the beach where Australia lost a Prime Minister- Harold Holt. In 1967, Harold Holt went swimming with friends at Cheviot Beach, a notoriously dangerous beach and was lost, presumed drowned. His body was never recovered and there are several of conspiracy theories surrounding the disappearance but anyone who sees the beach on a good day can see that it’s a dangerous place and not smart place to swim. The beach proper is closed to the public but you can see it from the path on top of the sand dunes.

Cheviot Beach, where Australia lost a Prime Minister
Cheviot Beach, where Australia lost a Prime Minister
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Keep an eye out for the wildlife! I’ve seen echidnas, wallabies, plenty of birds, and a snake here!
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Walking track looking towards the Quarantine Station

Cape Schanck and surrounds on foot

One of my favourite ways to relax is to go for a good long walk- either alone or with a friend. I’m lucky to live in an area with many trails and some truly beautiful scenery. One place I love and spent a lot of time hiking leading up to my trip to Peru is Cape Schanck. There are several walking trails leading out from the main carpark there and all are beautiful. Today I thought I’d share some of my favourite photos from my walks!

Cape Schanck

Stairs looking down to Cape Schanck beach
Stairs looking down to Cape Schanck beach
Going down the stairs at Cape Schanck
Going down the stairs at Cape Schanck
Pyramid Rock at Cape Schanck
Pyramid Rock at Cape Schanck

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Looking up the stairs towards Cape Schanck Lighthouse
Looking up the stairs towards Cape Schanck Lighthouse
Cape Schanck Lighthouse
Cape Schanck Lighthouse

Bushranger’s Bay

View from the cliff top en route to Bushranger's Bay
View from the cliff top en route to Bushranger’s Bay
View from the cliff top on the way to Bushranger's Bay
View from the cliff top en route to Bushranger’s Bay
Bushranger's Bay
Bushranger’s Bay
Bushranger's Bay
Bushranger’s Bay (it was a moody early spring day)

Fingal Beach

View looking towards Fingal & Gunnamatta beaches
View looking towards Fingal & Gunnamatta beaches
Cliffs at Fingal Beach
Cliffs at Fingal Beach

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Coming down the stairs to Fingal beach was easy...
Coming down the stairs to Fingal beach was easy…
Going back up the 800 metres of stairs was not!
Going back up the 800 metres of stairs was not!

For any information on these walks/ locations, the Parks Victoria website has plenty or email me!

Peru! The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu

The trek is four days (well really 3, the last day is hardly anything). Beginning at KM82 and ending at Machu Picchu, it’s challenging but well worth the blisters and painful knees. Even in the rain. Along the way, you hike over Dead Woman’s Pass (4200 metres above sea level), see inca ruins and walk on some original Inca paths. Day one is easy, it’s a leisurely stroll compared to what’s to come.

Inca Trail day one
Inca Trail day one

Day two is the hardest, the hike ascends nearly 500 metres up to Dead Woman’s pass and is tough. It left me gasping and with low blood oxygen levels (yep, altitude sickness is a bitch). The walk down to campsite is tough on the knees- I was grateful for my walking poles then.

creek crossing on the Inca trail
creek crossing on the Inca trail
Dead Woman's Pass. The highest point on the Inca Trail
Dead Woman’s Pass. The highest point on the Inca Trail

Day three was flat compared to Day two. It’s the day you walk through the cloud forest and 90% of the path is original Incan paths. It’s beautiful. The narrow stone paths, tunnels and Incan ruins along the way all tease at how close you are to the end.

Intipata on the Inca Trail
Runkurakay on the Inca Trail
Incan tunnels and paths
Incan tunnels and paths
Intipata
Intipata

Day four. You’re up at 330am so the porters can pack up the campsite and run down the mountain to catch the only morning train they’re allowed on home. It’s a short walk to gates of the National Park (which doesn’t open until 5am) and from there it’s not long until you reach the  Sun Gate where (weather permitting) you get your first look at Machu Picchu.

Machu PIcchu
Machu Picchu

The day I arrived it was rainy and foggy. We didn’t see anything until we walked into the ruins proper. I didn’t care. It was my birthday, I had hiked for days with a seriously painful hip, ruined my knees on the descents and made it to the top of the mountain. I set the challenge months ago and succeeded. It was worth the pain, the cold, the wet. I won’t be doing it again though.